Words that amuse me

This post is going to be a short one. I have something extremely important to do (catching up on Mad Men). I did have something deep and insightful in mind– something that probably would have turned into a long-winded rant, about “the business of blogging” and creating/losing identity. But that will have to wait.

Instead, you get my official list of hilarious Britishisms (and confirmation that I have an 8-year-old’s sense of humor).

  • Nappies. “Soiled” nappies, in particular, just cracks me up. (That’s American for “makes me laugh.” I hope it doesn’t translate to something inappropriate, like this next one…)
  • Helmet. My neighbor was shocked when John told me I could borrow his helmet to ride my bike (I have one of my own now). Apparently helmet means something quite different here. And that’s all I’ll say about that.
  • Wind. As in, a strong gust of wind. John’s colleague said the other day that one downside to dogs is that they can be rather…windy! The pharmacy sells medicine to combat “wind” as well. Ever since we learned about this one, John and I can’t stop laughing at our own snide remarks about hurricanes and drafts in the house.
  • Brilliant. Everything is brilliant. “Brill,” for short. Seriously? Maybe it just means “good” here. Or “okay.” 
  • Clever. That person is not smart, they’re clever. I don’t know about you, but whenever I hear “clever,” I picture someone being up to no good. Devious. Sneaky!
  • “Getting on.” How are you getting on with that? What do you mean, climbing on top of some unsurmountable obstacle? Or Let’s Get it On? The day I start using this one will be the day I officially relinquish my semi-American identity.

What’s that? Sorry, Mad Men’s calling.

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4 thoughts on “Words that amuse me”

  1. So interesting, Clea, and funny too. Have you heard anyone say yet “Mind your head”, when getting on a bus? That one always cracked me up. And do they have “a spot of tea?’

  2. Have you heard “like chalk and cheese” (Am. English= “like night and day.”) How about time “half five” meaning 4:30 (I think?) Those English really butcher “our” language, don’t they???

  3. My favourites are “that’s just not cricket” = “that’s just not right,” as well as “squiffy”= “unwell.” One that made my boyfriend do a double take was when I told him he’d need to get suspenders, which apparently are the same as a garter belt.

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